Archive for November 3rd, 2007

November 3, 2007

For Venezuela’s poor, music opens doors

Wilfrido Galarraga, 21, played trumpet on the roof of his home in La Vega, a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Caracas, as his nephew Onil Galarraga, 8, joined in on French horn.
Wilfrido Galarraga, 21, played trumpet on the roof of his home in La Vega, a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Caracas, as his nephew Onil Galarraga, 8, joined in on French horn. (Globe Photo / David Rochkind)

CARACAS — By the time Lennar Acosta was introduced to classical music at age 15, he had been arrested nine times for armed robbery and drug offenses. A year into the youth’s sentence at a state home, a music teacher came to offer the delinquent, abused, and abandoned children there free instruments, instruction, and an opening to a new life.

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November 3, 2007

Venezuela youths transformed by music

 

By Jens Erik Gould
In Caracas


Placido Domingo cried when he saw the Venezuelan Youth Orchestra perform.

The world-renowned opera singer confessed that the concert evoked the strongest emotions he had ever felt.

Venezuelan youth orchestra

The young players have won over many big name musicians

Sir Simon Rattle, director of the Berlin Philharmonic, swore that the country’s youth orchestras were doing the most important work in classical music anywhere in the world.

And former Berlin Philharmonic director Claudio Abbado only needed to see one performance by the orchestra to invite the Venezuelans to play in Germany.

The talented musicians of the National System of Venezuelan Youth and Children’s Orchestras are a source of national pride, like football stars in other Latin American countries.

They have also inspired 23 countries across the hemisphere to launch similar music education programmes.

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November 3, 2007

Dudamel is absolutely revelatory

MUSIC REVIEW
The Venezuelan conductor and the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra show
America how it’s done.
By Mark Swed
Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

November 3, 2007

SIMON says it is the most important thing happening in classical
music in the world. “Simon” is Simon Rattle, music director of the
Berlin Philharmonic. “It” is El Sistema, the youth orchestra program
in Venezuela.

“It” might also describe the Simón Bolívar Youth Orchestra of
Venezuela, the cream of a 250,000-student crop, which began its first
U.S. tour at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday night under its
music director, Gustavo Dudamel. And if this incredible orchestra
hits San Francisco, Boston and New York with the same revelatory
effect as at the first Disney concert, our country, with its poor
music education, may never — should never — be the same.

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